postheader postheader postheader postheader postheader



Animal Emergency Response Tips
 

A safe home, a regular routine, a soft bed – the things that bring you comfort bring your pet comfort, too. Which is why it’s so important to give some advance thought to how you’d handle your pet responsibilities during and after a disastrous storm or other event.

Your family emergency plan should include considerations for Fluffy or Fido. Not just so they’re comfortable, but so they’re safe, too. With National Animal Disaster Preparedness Day coming up on May 8, here are some emergency planning tips for families with pets from Ready.gov:

Prepare Now so You and Your Pet Are Ready Later

  • Make sure your pet has ID. Always have your home address and/or phone number on a tag attached to your pet’s collar – or printed on the collar itself. You might also consider having a microchip implanted in case those tags fall off.
     
  • Keep a current photo of your pet handy. This is important for identification purposes in the event there’s no microchip or tags. If you really want to be prepared, create a “Lost Pet” flyer and keep a few printouts in your emergency kit.
     
  • Identify shelters or hotels that accept pets. Keep a list of their phone numbers and addresses, and include your local boarding facility’s number in case you need to drop off your pet. You could also create a list of friends or family outside the area who can host you and your pets.
     
  • Think security. It’s a good idea to have a secure carrier or harness so pets can’t escape if they panic.
     
  • Create a separate pet emergency kit. You should have emergency supplies for you and your family — don’t forget your animal friends! Canned or moist food is best for them, as it can reduce their need for water. Other things to include: blankets, bottled water, pet first-aid supplies, vet records, an extra collar and leash, food dishes and other supplies specific to pet type (such as cat litter, etc.).
     
  • Consider a buddy system. Talk with friends and neighbors and create a plan to help each other care for pets during emergencies. If one of you isn’t home when disaster strikes, the other agrees to see to the animals’ needs for care or evacuation. Be sure to discuss where to meet after an evacuation.

See to Your Pets’ Needs During a Disaster

  • Don’t leave pets outside or tied up. They may become frightened and escape. And, remaining outside can put them at greater risk of harm.
     
  • Separate dogs, cats and other animals. Even if they normally get along, stressful situations can lead to irrational behavior.
     
  • Have more unique pets, such as birds? Talk to your veterinarian about their specific needs in emergencies.
     
  • Keep a supply of newspapers. If your pets cannot go outside, you’ll need to create space indoors for them to … well, you know. Protect those areas with newspapers, towels or other items.
     
  • If at all possible, do not leave your pets behind if you need to evacuate. If you must, however, confine them to a safe area inside your home with access to plenty of food and water. Even leave the toilet seat up in case their other water runs out. And, it’s a good idea to leave an easily seen sign detailing how many pets are in the house, and how you can be reached.

Continue to Be Cautious Once It’s Over

  • Watch your pets closely. They may still be frightened, even days after a disaster. And, even familiar areas may have changed, so keep them on leash and stay close. Remember, there may be downed power lines or other hazards still present.
     
  • Evaluate how things went. Could your emergency plan have been better? Are there things you wish you had included in your pet’s disaster kit? Do you need to research more shelters and other facilities that will accept pets? Now’s the time to do it — before the next emergency.

If you’re like most people, you consider your pets part of the family. Including them in your plans, and taking steps before a disaster strikes, will make it easier to keep the whole family together.

 

Pets and Liability Coverage

As a pet parent, you’re responsible for the everyday and emergency needs of your furry, feathered or scaly friends. But, you’re also responsible for their behavior. Bad pet behavior can cause severe injuries, potentially leaving you liable for other people’s medical bills, property damage, legal expenses and more. Would the liability coverage on your homeowners policy come to your aid? For some general guidelines, check out our blog on pet liability.

Posted by Safeco April 25, 2016

http://www.safeco.com/blog-detail/pet-safety-natural-disasters/1240030265022

For more information, contact us at 713-515-5774 or 713-858-8113

Share |


No Comments


Post a Comment
Name
Required
E-Mail
Required (Not Displayed)
Comment
Required


All comments are moderated and stripped of HTML.
Submission Validation
Required
CAPTCHA
Change the CAPTCHA codeSpeak the CAPTCHA code
 
Enter the Validation Code from above.
NOTICE: This blog and website are made available by the publisher for educational and informational purposes only. It is not be used as a substitute for competent insurance, legal, or tax advice from a licensed professional in your state. By using this blog site you understand that there is no broker client relationship between you and the blog and website publisher.
Blog Archive


View Mobile Version
   

HOME PAGE ABOUT US GET A QUOTE REFER A FRIEND CONTACT US

            10101 Fondren Rd, Suite 340 | Houston, TX 77096 | Phone: 713.515.5774

Powered by Insurance Website Builder
Facebook LinkedIn Blog